Down Memory Lane

This week's Down Memory Lane comes from Jeannette Dewars Dobrick from Hastings, Minnesota, USA. It features her two Brechin born uncles, Jim (left) and Will Dewar (right) in front of 57 High Street, where they ran a violin and bicycle shop from about 1899 - 1904. 'Will was the violin maker, and according to the book 'British Violin Makers, Classical and Modern', Will 'is a maker of great promise'. One of his violins was offered for sale in the UK for �350 in 1979.

This week's Down Memory Lane comes from Jeannette Dewars Dobrick from Hastings, Minnesota, USA. It features her two Brechin born uncles, Jim (left) and Will Dewar (right) in front of 57 High Street, where they ran a violin and bicycle shop from about 1899 - 1904. 'Will was the violin maker, and according to the book 'British Violin Makers, Classical and Modern', Will 'is a maker of great promise'. One of his violins was offered for sale in the UK for �350 in 1979.

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40 years ago

Work has started on the site for the Health Centre to be erected on the west side of Brechin Infirmary. The centre has been designed by the Eastern Regional Board’s architect’s and engineers’ departments.

The contract for the building, to cost £73,730, has been placed with Burness & Son (Montrose), Ltd.

It is expected that the centre will be completed by the end of 1973.

30 years ago

Brechin High School’s recent sponsored walk raised over £4,000 for its mini-bus fund and Rector Kenneth Dron has described the effort as “quite magnificent”.

He thanked the “generous Brechin public” who had already contributed £2,500 raised at a coffee morning and fayre.

The profits from other school fund-raisers, like the tuck shop, will continue to swell the fund.

The school hopes soon to take delivery of a new mini-bus and have enough left over to build a garage.

20 years ago

THE GREEK symbol for efficiency which is proudly displayed at TI Matrix Engineering in Brechin, recognises the factory’s campaign to use “power for efficiency and productivity”.

The factory has won the north Scotland section of Scottish Hydro Electric’s PEP Award scheme and now goes forward to the national finals.

The award results from the company’s investment in a new £45,000 furnace to help it meet contracts for British Rail and the London Underground.

Mr Rab Tocher, director of the factory’s special furnace division, said the furnace is used for the stress relieving of bogie frames after welding and prior to machining.

Waste heat from the furnace is used to dry the paintwork on the finished bogies, reducing the ‘cure’ period from seven days to one.