Society reveals global interest in Pictish Arts thanks to social media

Photograph of the Pictish stone in the churchyard at Aberlemno Parish Church (the stone is sometimes known as Aberlemno II). The battle scene depicted is generally accepted to be that of the Battle of Nechtansmere''Pic from Wikipedia'This work has been released into the public domain' by its author, I, Greenshed'. This applies worldwide.
Photograph of the Pictish stone in the churchyard at Aberlemno Parish Church (the stone is sometimes known as Aberlemno II). The battle scene depicted is generally accepted to be that of the Battle of Nechtansmere''Pic from Wikipedia'This work has been released into the public domain' by its author, I, Greenshed'. This applies worldwide.

A society set up to raise public awareness of Pictish stones has been pleasantly surprised by the world-wide interest they’ve received online.

The Pictish Arts Society, which aims to raise public awareness of the Pictish stones, history and culture, has recently delved into the world of social media, setting up a Facebook account that has generated interest from Istanbul to Albuquerque.

A Society spokesman explained: “We started our Facebook page back in January 2012 with the aim of publicising our lecture series, then at Pictavia near Brechin, and picking up a few new members for the society.

“Since then we’ve grown to a global audience of nearly 3,600 fans. We share a mixture of Pictish interest posts by other pages and our own events, photos and activities.

“The most surprising thing is the number of overseas fans we’ve acquired. We have more fans in Istanbul than Inverness. More fans in Albequerque than Arbroath!

“Most of our fans are in the US (1,160) then the UK (784) and Australia (165) and India (160).

“Until recently we even had a fan in Antarctica, at the research base. Some of our hotspots include Tehran and Mexico City. We’re pretty big in Mumbai too!

“Some of our posts have been viewed more than 8000 times. We typically reach around 6000 people per week.

“Social Media has allowed our small society to extend its reach to a truly global audience.

“We use it to promote the aims of the Society- to raise public awareness of early Scottish history and the Pictish stones, and to encourage various arts inspired by the symbols and designs depicted on them. We can now take that message all the way from Brechin to Burma.”

The Society hopes that by sharing their success with social media, it will encourage other groups to get involved.