1,000-mile cycle raises over £3,000

A cheque for �3450 was handed over to the Eileen McCallum Trust at Forsters Brechin on Wednesday afternoon. The money was raised by mother and daughter Maureen and Shannon Douglas pictured here with the cheque and Cole Robertson who has the illness. In the background are, from left - Liam Pirie, David Pirie, Steve Scott Forsters MD and Charlene Robertson.

A cheque for �3450 was handed over to the Eileen McCallum Trust at Forsters Brechin on Wednesday afternoon. The money was raised by mother and daughter Maureen and Shannon Douglas pictured here with the cheque and Cole Robertson who has the illness. In the background are, from left - Liam Pirie, David Pirie, Steve Scott Forsters MD and Charlene Robertson.

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An EMPLOYEE from Forster Roofing and her daughter, took to their bikes in June, raising over £3,000 for children with fatal progressive muscle-wasting disease.

A cheque for £3,450 was handed over to the Eileen McCallum Trust in a presentation last Wednesday.

Forster Roofing’s human resources manager, Maureen Douglas, cycled 1,000 miles, from Lands End to John O’Groats via Arran, with her 15-year-old daughter Shannon to raise the profile of a voluntary organisation set up by families who are affected by Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

The stepson of David Pirie, Forster Roofing’s most experienced and long serving tiler/slater, six-year-old Cole, was born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy - a progressive and fatal muscle-wasting disease affecting approximately 10 male children born in Scotland each year.

Cole, who along with his step-dad, lives in Montrose with David’s fiance Charlene and three-year-old brother Liam, was born with the disorder which is caused by a mutation in the dystrophin gene, located in humans on the X chromosome.

Initial symptoms can be difficulty in walking between the ages of one and three and the inability to run or jump like their peers.

The children face a life confined to a wheelchair from as young as eight.

In their teenage years, as their muscles weaken further, they lose the ability to do everyday tasks such as feeding themselves.

Their heart and lungs are also affected and as a result they face a short life typically between 18-25 years.

To complete the cycle, over the period from Sunday, June 17, and Saturday, June 30, Maureen and Shannon cycled on average 70 miles a day staying overnight at Youth Hostels, carrying their own gear on touring bikes.

The Eileen McCallum Trust aims to provide financial support to families affected by DMD to ensure their sons have the equipment and care services they require for an improved quality of life. Cole will directly receive a percentage of the monies raised.

For further information on the Eileen McCallum Trust visit: www.eileenmccallumtrust.org.