10,000 stitchers add their mark to historic tapestry panel

Presiding Officer Tricia Marwick MSP (2nd right) is joined by Lillian Manson of South Queensferry (2nd Left), one of the stitchers;  historian Alistair Moffat (right) and  Andrew Crummy (left), the artist who designed the panel.  Picture:  Andrew Cowan/Scottish Parliament

Presiding Officer Tricia Marwick MSP (2nd right) is joined by Lillian Manson of South Queensferry (2nd Left), one of the stitchers; historian Alistair Moffat (right) and Andrew Crummy (left), the artist who designed the panel. Picture: Andrew Cowan/Scottish Parliament

0
Have your say

A new embroidered panel which was stitched by 10,000 people from across Scotland has been unveiled at Holyrood.

The Great Tapestry of Scotland People’s Panel celebrates the Scottish Parliament’s connection to one of Scotland’s most ambitious arts projects.

Launched in 2013, the Great Tapestry is a series of embroidered panels depicting the history of Scotland and the People Panel is its latest addition.

The Presiding Officer, Rt Hon. Tricia Marwick MSP said: “With the participation of people in communities from Glenrothes to Glasgow and Lerwick to Largs, the Great Tapestry is a truly engaging celebration of Scotland’s

history, culture and politics. The People’s Panel will serve as a permanent reminder of the involvement of both the Parliament and the many people from across Scotland in its creation.

“I’ll long remember the queues of people who flocked to see the Great Tapestry during both of its showings here. The People’s Panel not only celebrates key moments in Scotland’s story, but it also celebrates the unique relationship between the tapestry, the people and the Parliament.”

Ms Marwick was joined by artist Andrew Crummy and historian Alistair Moffat for the unveiling last week.

Also in attendance were a few of the estimated 10,000 people who had added a stitch to the People’s Panel.

Holyrood hosted the first public showing of the Great Tapestry in 2013 and welcomed it back after a tour of Scotland a year later.

In all, the tapestry exhibition attracted more than 100,000 visitors during its time at Holyrood.

During its second showing in the Parliament, visitors were invited to add a stitch to the People’s Panel.

Mr Crummy said: “It was an honour to design this panel and a joy to see so many people adding a stitch. I’ve met many people who were thrilled to have had the opportunity to contribute to a small piece of history.”

The Great Tapestry will be display at the Jute Museum, Dundee from March 19 until May 1.

Back to the top of the page