Byelaws extend booze ban area

The notices that are on display in central Brechin - pointing out that it is an offence to drink alcohol in public places, with those who do facing a penalty of up to �500.
The notices that are on display in central Brechin - pointing out that it is an offence to drink alcohol in public places, with those who do facing a penalty of up to �500.

THE area of central Brechin banning boozing in public has been extended under new byelaws which come into effect at the end of this month.

Byelaws which ban drinking alcohol in designated public places in all seven Angus burghs will take effect on September 29.

The Prohibition of Consumption of Alcohol in Designated Public Places (Arbroath, Brechin, Carnoustie, Forfar, Kirriemuir, Monifieth and Montrose) Byelaws 2011 were approved by the council in July and have now been confirmed by the Scottish Ministers.

Angus Council already had byelaws in place in five of the burghs - including Brechin.

The new byelaws establish completely new areas to be covered in the other two burghs - Forfar and Monifieth - and create additional areas in Arbroath and Brechin.

The byelaws do not make any changes to the current areas covered in Carnoustie, Kirriemuir and Montrose.

Any person who consumes alcohol in a public place within areas designated by the byelaws shall be guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding £500.

The convener of the Licensing Board, councillor John Whyte, welcomed the introduction of the byelaws and thanked all those who participated in the extensive consultation process which lead to the byelaws being brought into force.

He also urged the owners of licensed premises to carefully check the terms of their premises licence to ensure that beer gardens or other external areas where the consumption of alcohol is permitted are covered by their licence.

He said: “If beer gardens or other external areas where the consumption of alcohol is allowed are not covered by a premises licence and if the area is considered to be a public place within the byelaw areas then patrons consuming alcohol in that area will be committing a criminal offence.

If a premises licence holder is in any doubt as to which parts of their premises are covered by their premises licence then they should contact the offices of the clerk to the board for advice and assistance.”