Andover’s launch pad for success

Gordon selling difficult oragami

Gordon selling difficult oragami

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PUPILS involved in Andover Primary School’s Launch Pad have been working hard on their own concept of marketing, fund-raising and team work with stirring results, which will see two animal charities benefit with cash donations.

“We first made an origami model of the Loch Ness Monster on the run up to Burns’ day and enjoyed it so much that we wanted to do more,” explained teacher Grant Johnston.

Kieran taking orders.

Kieran taking orders.

“We then had the idea that we could make lots of models and sell them to raise money for an animal charity.

“We developed our skills in making origami models by following video and picture instructions we found on an origami website.

“We made over 30 different prototypes including a football strip, mobile phone, and lots of different animals.”

Then came the sales, marketing and advertising pitch.

Camerson selling easy Oragami.

Camerson selling easy Oragami.

“We then carried out some market research by inviting four children from each class at Andover to look at our prototypes and give us their thoughts on how much they would spend buying each one,” added Grant.”

We gave each child who helped us a free model of their choice.

“We then decided how much we were going to sell each model for.

“We had different prices depending on the size and difficulty of the models.

Jordan selling limited edition Oragami.

Jordan selling limited edition Oragami.

“The pupils then set up a stall to display the models and invited each class to come to the class, where we took many orders.”

Focusing on purchasing and production, Grant continued: “To start making our orders the pupils had to buy our raw materials from the teacher.

“It cost 1p for an A4 sized piece of recycled paper and 2p for an A4 sized piece of coloured/white paper.

“The pupils had to decide whether to borrow the money from the bank of The Launch Pad and pay interest or use their own money tokens they had earned in class.

The Launch Pad Boys with "Star".

The Launch Pad Boys with "Star".

“Over 200 models were made and some £152.40 raised.”

The pupils then used the internet to find out about local animal charities and invite representatives to The Launch Pad.

The SSPCA, Help for Abandoned Animals and Alison Milne, a dog warden from Angus council, popped along to talk to the pupils.

“It was decided to share the money equally between the charities.