Hollingworth biography appeal proves successful

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An appeal by the Friends of Brechin Town House Museum for a copy of Catherine Hollingworth’s biography has been successful.

The Friends of Brechin Town House Museum made a request for some much needed assistance in the pages of the Brechin Advertiser and two local ladies have come to their rescue.

As part of the research about her life the Friends were trying to obtain a copy of her biography ‘Tilting at Windmills’ written in 1991 by Alan Nicol.

The book proved hard to come by as it was no longer in print. A thorough search of online book stores was unsuccessful and no copies are held in Angus libraries.

It was then that they put the appeal in the paper, hoping readers of the paper could help in their quest.

Grateful for the help was Steve Nicoll of the Friends who said: “Two extremely kind and helpful locals, Mrs Freida Haggart and Miss Grace Glen, have been in touch and thanks to their efforts a copy of ‘Tilting at Windmills’ has been obtained as well as a loaned copy of her auto- biography ‘Building Bridges’.

“The Friends are very grateful for their contribution and would like to publicly express their thanks.

“It is hoped that the books and other archived artefacts will feature in the Town House Museum in 2012 placing a focus on a Brechiner who went on to achieve so much in the field of speech therapy and children’s dramatic productions in Aberdeen.”

Catherine was born in Panmure Street and also lived in Bank Street with maternal family connections to the parish church near Loch Lee in Glen Esk, although her surname originates from her father who was born in Meltham, near Huddersfield in Yorkshire.

James Hollingworth and his brother Harry had moved to Brechin to establish a music shop and it was there that James met and married Catherines’ mother, Margaret Jane Clark Manson in 1903. Catherine Hollingworth was born the following year and died in in Aberdeen in 1999.

“She led a full and fascinating life and her important contribution to speech therapy merits wider recognition. With access to both books about her life this is now possible,” Steve concluded.